Calendar

Mar
17
Fri
Lost Synagogues of Europe: Eastern European Jewish Postcards from the Collection of František Bányai @ Eldridge St synagogue
Mar 17 @ 10:00 – Jun 8 @ 17:00

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An exhibition of historic postcards on Jewish themes from the extensive collection of Prague Jewish leader František Bányai. The postcards offer a view of a time and place that no longer exist — synagogues, many destroyed during the Second World War, people on their way to prayer, celebrating, and sending greetings in a vanished Eastern Europe of a century ago.

Sunday-Thursday from 10am to 5pm

Friday from 10am to 3pm

Synagogue tours are offered on the hour (10, 11, 12, 1, 2, 3 & 4).

Closed every Saturday.

 

Apr
2
Sun
Polish Jewish Studies Workshop @ University of Michigan
Apr 2 all-day

The aim of the Polish Jewish Studies Initiative and this workshop is to establish an international forum for communication among scholars working in the growing field of Polish Jewish studies; to identify theoretical and methodological developments and new research; and to create a forum for scholars, educators, and activists who rigorously pursue the study of Polish and Jewish cultures more intentionally.

The 2017 workshop will  explore key developments and new directions in the field of Polish Jewish studies, focusing on changing approaches to Polish Jewish culture, scholarship and identity under the rubric of “Generations and Genealogies.”

Click here for full details

 

 

Apr
3
Mon
Polish Jewish Studies Workshop @ University of Michigan
Apr 3 all-day

The aim of the Polish Jewish Studies Initiative and this workshop is to establish an international forum for communication among scholars working in the growing field of Polish Jewish studies; to identify theoretical and methodological developments and new research; and to create a forum for scholars, educators, and activists who rigorously pursue the study of Polish and Jewish cultures more intentionally.

The 2017 workshop will  explore key developments and new directions in the field of Polish Jewish studies, focusing on changing approaches to Polish Jewish culture, scholarship and identity under the rubric of “Generations and Genealogies.”

Click here for full details

 

 

Apr
4
Tue
Polish Jewish Studies Workshop @ University of Michigan
Apr 4 all-day

The aim of the Polish Jewish Studies Initiative and this workshop is to establish an international forum for communication among scholars working in the growing field of Polish Jewish studies; to identify theoretical and methodological developments and new research; and to create a forum for scholars, educators, and activists who rigorously pursue the study of Polish and Jewish cultures more intentionally.

The 2017 workshop will  explore key developments and new directions in the field of Polish Jewish studies, focusing on changing approaches to Polish Jewish culture, scholarship and identity under the rubric of “Generations and Genealogies.”

Click here for full details

 

 

Apr
6
Thu
Florence Ghetto Mapping presentation @ Temple Emanu-El Streicker Center
Apr 6 @ 18:30 – 20:30
Apr
26
Wed
From Shtetl to City @ S.W. Ripley Center
Apr 26 @ 18:45 – 20:45
Botosani, Romania -- elaborate ark in the synagogue

Botosani, Romania — elaborate ark in the synagogue

A lecture by JHE Coordinator Ruth Ellen Gruber on Jewish heritage sites and travel in Europe, sponsored by Smithsonian Associates.

For full details and tickets, click here

 

 

May
28
Sun
Guided tour @ Jewish cemetery, Solingen
May 28 @ 11:00 – 12:30

 

Public, free guided tours of the cemetery take place twice a year, though individual and school tours can be arranged.

Click here to see full details and schedule.

 

Jun
28
Wed
Dark Tourism, Holocaust, WW2 @ Glasgow Caledonian University
Jun 28 – Jul 1 all-day
More than 1.7 million people visited Auschwitz in 2015

More than 1.7 million people visited Auschwitz in 2015

Dark Tourism Sites related to the Holocaust, the Nazi Past and World War II: Visitation and Practice

The aim of this interdisciplinary conference, which is especially aimed at tourism researchers, historians and memorial site employees, is to reflect on experiences with tourist visitors, their expectations and the resulting conclusions and implications for the work of memorial sites, museums and documentation centres in international and comparative perspective. The practice and function of organised and individual travel and tourism agencies will also be taken into consideration. We will debate questions, such as:

What are the problems and challenges connected with “dark tourism” as a factor in popular encounters with and understanding of the history of the Holocaust? What role does tourism play in expanding Holocaust education?

If tourism is a source of environmental degradation of the physical structure and landscape, how can that be balanced with the educational and experiential value of visitorship?

How can “dark tourism” be utilised to reveal historical interconnections in their respective geographical and historical setting, for instance between the German occupation, local societies and mass murder in Central Eastern Europe?

 

Click to see full details and further contacts