Lithuania: Šeduva cemetery restoration receives recognition

 

seduva-cemetery-wm1

 

The restoration of the Jewish cemetery in Šeduva, Lithuania, is one of 13 “heritage achievements” from 11 European countries taking part in the Creative Europe program of the European Union to be awarded a Special Mention by the jury for the 2017 European Union Prize for Cultural Heritage / Europa Nostra Awards 2017.

The cemetery is part of the broader Lost Shtetl project, which includes mass grave memorials and will eventually include a Jewish museum. It received its Special Mention in the Conservation category.

 

Jewish cemetery in SEduva

Jewish cemetery in SEduva

 

In restoring and maintaining the Jewish cemetery in  Šeduva, the May 1 awards announcement said:

 

the local community has succeeded in its efforts to restore, commemorate and to respectfully maintain the memory of members of their community who, since the Holocaust, no longer live in the town.

 

Special Mentions are given “to outstanding contributions to the conservation and enhancement of Europe’s cultural heritage which are particularly appreciated by the Jury but which were not included in the final selection to receive an Award.” The EU Cultural Heritage/Europa Nostra Awards — announced in early April — included recognition of the Jewish Cultural Heritage Education Program of the POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews.

The program, which received the award in the Education Training and Awareness Raising category, is supported by EEA and Norway Grants and

 

includes a broad range of activities aimed at engaging people from every part of society in discovering and discussing the Polish Jewish community’s past including its links with Norway.

 

See drone video of the Šeduva cemetery:

 

 

See our main JHE post about the Lost Shtetl project

 

 

 

2 thoughts on “Lithuania: Šeduva cemetery restoration receives recognition

  1. very interesting, was there ever a prayer hall on the cemetery site? Are the stones which are now in an upright position actually grave markers or were they put up where there was a space and not actually over the grave?

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